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Enviro Base Lite

Enviro-Base is an all-in-one database, comprised of six different categories for data entry and retrieval: Soil Properties: Including Hydraulic Conductivity, Porosity, Specific Yield, and Specific Storage, Half-Life, Drinking Water Standards, Adsorption, Dispersivity Chemical Properties: Including Viscosity, Henry's coefficient, Vapour Pressure, Log Kow, Density


BioScreen

BIOSCREEN is a screening model which simulates remediation through natural attenuation of dissolved hydrocarbons at petroleum fuel release sites. The software, programmed in the Microsoft Excel spreadsheet environment and based on the Domenico analytical solute transport model, has the ability to simulate advection, dispersion, adsorption, and aerobic decay as well as anaerobic reactions that have been shown to be the dominant biodegradation processes at many petroleum release sites.


CHEMFLO-2000

CHEMFLO-2000 enables users to simulate water movement and chemical fate and transport in vadose zones. The software could be used to assist regulators, environmental managers, consultants, scientists, and students in understanding unsaturated flow and transport processes. Water movement and chemical transport are modeled using the Richards and the convection-dispersion equations, respectively. The equations are solved numerically using the finite differences approach. CHEMFLO-2000 is an upgraded version of CHEMFLO V1.3 that was released in 1989.


Aquifer Test Analysis Program

Several spreadsheets have been developed for the analysis of aquifer-test and slug-test data. Each spreadsheet incorporates analytical solution(s) of the partial differential equation for ground-water flow to a well for a specific type of condition or aquifer. The derivations of the analytical solutions were previously published. Thus, this report abbreviates the theoretical discussion, but includes practical information about each method and the important assumptions for the applications of each method.


Time-Series Analysis and Drawdown Estimation

This spreadsheet has been developed for analyzing time series with an emphasis on estimating drawdowns during aquifer tests by removing extraneous waterlevel changes at observation wells resulting from barometric pressure changes, earth tides, or regional water-level trends. The spreadsheet was developed for Microsoft Excel version 9.0 or higher. The spreadsheet has been tested for accuracy using datasets from different aquifer tests and FORTRAN solutions of dry earth tide and gravity tide.


WTAQ

The computer program WTAQ calculates hydraulic-head drawdowns in a confined or water-table aquifer that result from pumping at a well of finite or infinitesimal diameter. The program is based on an analytical model of axial-symmetric ground-water flow in a homogeneous and anisotropic aquifer. The program allows for well-bore storage and well-bore skin at the pumped well and for delayed drawdown response at an observation well; by including these factors, it is possible to accurately evaluate the specific storage of a water-table aquifer from early-time drawdown data in observation wells and piezometers. For water-table aquifers, the program allows for either delayed or instantaneous drainage from the unsaturated zone.


HYSEP

HYSEP is a computer program that can be used to separate a streamflow hydrograph into base-flow and surface-runoff components. The base-flow component has traditionally been associated with ground-water discharge and the surface-runoff component with precipitation that enters the stream as overland runoff. HYSEP includes three methods of hydrograph separation that are referred to in the literature as the fixed-interval, sliding-interval, and localminimum methods. The program also describes the frequency and duration of measured streamflow and computed base flow and surface runoff.


PULSE

The PULSE program is intended for analyzing a ground-water-flow system that is characterized by diffuse areal recharge to the water table and ground-water discharge to a stream. Program use can be appropriate if all or most ground water in the basin discharges to the stream and if a streamflow-gaging station at the downstream end of the basin measures all or most outflow. Ground-water pumpage and the regulation and diversion of streamflow should be negligible.


Part

The program uses streamflow partitioning to estimate a daily record of base flow (ground-water discharge) under the streamflow record. The program scans the period of record for days that fit a requirement of antecedent recession, designates ground-water discharge to be equal to streamflow on these days, then linearly interpolates the groundwater discharge on days that do not fit the requirement of antecedent recession. Although calculations are made on the daily time scale, the author recommends results should be reported at a larger time scale (at least a month but preferably a larger time scale). The PART program is intended for analyzing a ground-water-flow system that is characterized by diffuse areal recharge to the water table and ground-water discharge to a stream. The method is appropriate if all or most ground water in the basin discharges to the stream and if a streamflow-gaging station at the downstream end of the basin measures all or most outflow. Regulation and diversion of streamflow should be negligible.


Rora

The program estimates ground-water recharge using the recession-curve-displacement method. Also known as the Rorabaugh Method (Rorabaugh, 1964; Daniel, 1976), the method is based on the change in total potential ground-water discharge that is caused by each recharge event. Results of the program were compared with results of the manual application of the Rorabaugh Method (Rutledge and Daniel, 1994). The RORA program is intended for analyzing a ground-water-flow system that is characterized by diffuse areal recharge to the water table and ground-water discharge to a stream. The method is appropriate if all or most ground water in the basin discharges to the stream and if a streamflow-gaging station at the downstream end of the basin measures all or most outflow. Regulation and diversion of streamflow should be negligible.


OWL

The OWL program is a simple tool to evaluate existing monitoring well networks and assist in the selection of new monitoring well locations. The program uses ground-water elevation measurements to evaluate variations in ground-water flow magnitude and direction over time and calculate corresponding plume migration paths. A simple analysis combining the potential locations of the plume and the coverage of monitoring wells at a site allows the user to evaluate whether existing monitoring wells are optimally located, and to optimize the placement of new monitoring wells to better characterize plume location and future movement. The program accomplishes these tasks using simple algorithms and typically available field data.


WATEQ4

WATEQ4F is a chemical speciation code for natural waters. It uses field measurements of temperature, pH, Eh, dissolved oxygen and alkalinity, and the chemical analysis of a water sample as input and calculates the distribution of aqueous species, ion activities, and mineral saturation indices that indicate

the tendency of a water to dissolve or precipitate a set of minerals (see Drever, 1988; Nordstrom and Munoz, 1986). The model assumes homogeneous aqueous phase equilibria, except for redox species. Equilibrium with respect to mineral solubilities is not assumed. The program results are used primarily to examine the tendency of a water to reach mineral solubility equilibria as a constraint on interpreting the chemistry of natural waters.

 

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